12th July 2015

News Articles

10th June 2015

Cav Week has arrived.

Fort Hood, TX - As part of the weeklong celebration marking the Army’s 240th birthday and the 1st Cavalry Division’s 68th annual reunion, the division is hosting several events to honor current and former troopers.Eurotech Car Care KDH Digital Services

While the event honors veterans of all wars, a special emphasis will be made to remember Vietnam veterans as part of the ongoing 50th anniversary of the war.

Joseph Galloway, who co-authored the 1992 book "We Were Soldiers Once ... And Young," will be on post Thursday to introduce the 2002 movie based on the book. Current soldiers and Vietnam veterans will get to watch and discuss "We Were Soldiers," starring Mel Gibson, with Galloway, a journalist who covered the Vietnam War.

Galloway and a retired Lt. Gen. Hal Moore wrote the book, which is an account of the division’s 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment’s battle at Ia Drang in 1965.

Friday events

The big day for the public will be Friday, when 1st Cavalry Division Museum hosts a static display and an Army birthday cake-cutting at 9 a.m., officials said. The static display of working Army vehicles and helicopters will last until 3 p.m., and 1st Cavalry soldiers will be on hand to answer questions. Soldiers will man a video recorder next to a Vietnam War-era Jeep for anyone wishing to record a video message to honor Vietnam vets.

At 10 a.m., demonstrations by the 1st Cavalry Horse Detachment will take place at the stables near the main gate, and at 7 p.m., the "Spirit of Cavalry" — a pageant celebrating the history of the cavalry trooper — will take place on Cooper Field in front of the division’s headquarters.

Steven Draper, the curator for the 1st Cavalry museum, said Friday will be the busiest day of the year for the museum. He said 1st Cavalry veterans come from around the country to attend the reunion, which rotates every year between Fort Hood and another location.

Draper said he encourages all veterans and the public to attend. Attendees without military IDs will have to register at the Fort Hood visitor’s center near the main gate prior to entering the post.

Cav Week also includes a golf tournament today, and a 1st Cavalry Division Association banquet at 5:30 p.m. Saturday at the Killeen Civic and Conference Center. Maj. Gen. Michael Bills, the division commander, will be the keynote speaker. At 9 a.m. Sunday, a memorial will be held at the 76th Street Chapel.

The division’s units are also holding events, including 2nd Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, which is dedicating a room to Col. Rick Rescorla, a former 7th Cavalry soldier and an "American Vietnam hero whose life was taken on Sept. 11, 2001, as he helped evacuate 2,700 co-workers from the World Trade Center in New York City," according to a news release from the unit.

His actions are featured in "We Were Soldiers Once," and his widow, Susan Rescorla, will be on post for the room dedication.

By: Online News

17th June 2015
Memorial Day 2015

This past Memorial Day, 7 members of Echo Company 1st Bn 7th Cavalry (1968-1969) met in Washington to pay tribute to the 17 brave soldiers from that unit who died protecting us during those years.

We participated in the Memorial Day Observance at The Wall and laid a wreath for the second year in a row (see the attached picture of SP4 Jack Parente (left) and SP4 Jack Herzog presenting the wreath).

It was unusual for such a small company as Echo – just a 52 man recon company – to have so many losses, but most of those came as the result of a fierce battle one night on 17 March, 1969, when 11 were killed. We were protecting a small hilltop north and east of Bien Hoa, watching for enemy movement along the Dong Nia River – word was that the NVA were trying to move against the Bien Hoa complex. To take out our outpost, the NVA sent in a reinforced battalion.

The fight started at about 12:30am and ended when the sun came up. We held the hilltop and the attack on Bien Hoa never materialized. Those of us who survived owed our lives to those 11 who gave their lives for us. We will never forget.

The seven who met in Washington on Memorial Day and their ranks in Vietnam were:

CPT David Niles, Company Commander
LT Karl Swenson, Recon Platoon Leader
SSG JR Beard, Mortar Squad Leader
SP5 Frank Richardson, Medic
SP4 Jack Herzog, Rifleman
SP4 Jack Parente Grenadier
SP4 John Bushfield, Rifleman

By: Karl Swenson

15th May 2015

4th Squadron, 7th Cavalry

CAMP HOVEY, Korea - A decades-old 2nd Infantry Division unit stationed near the tense South-North Korea border will be deactivated. The 4th Squadron, 7th Cavalry will be deactivated on July 2, 2015 and will be immediately replaced by soldiers from the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division stationed at Fort Hood, Texas, the Defense Department announced Thursday.

Troops are typically stationed in South Korea on one- or two-year tours, leading to frequent turnover within units. The deactivation and switch to nine-month rotational deployments is part of a U.S. Army rotational plan that calls for similarly sized and capable units from the United States to train and deploy together.

By: Online News

10th September 2014

Ledward Barracks Closing Down this September

Ledward Barracks long time home to the 3rd Squadron is closing down and being turned over to the German Military

In 1967 A German National by the name of Hans Juergen Kuechle was awarded a "Honorary GarryOwen Trooper Certificate" by The 3dr Squadron Commander, and will be the last man standing in the area.

Due to his faithful service to the Regiment these past 26 years he was upgraded from "Honorary GarryOwen Trooper Certificate" to "Honorary Association Membership Certificate" and appointed as the 7th Cavalry Association Ambassador to Schwinefurt, Germany

Our Association Sec/Tres Bob Anderson kindly provided a Honorary membership certificate, An association representative Bob Tallieu (3-7 1967) presented Hans with the Honorary certificate of Membership and a GarryOwen Base Ball Cap. View Photos 3-7 Ledward Barracks 2014

By: Online News

12th May 2014

Ia Drang Reunion

AUGUSTA, Ga.--Some Vietnam veterans are having a reunion some 2 weeks ago in Augusta, but this isn't just your average group of vets. The 1st battalion 7th cavalry served in Vietnam, and their real life battles inspired the book and movie "We Were Soldiers."

"We Were Soldiers" tells the story of warriors dropped by helicopter into the La Drang Valley of Vietnam. They were immediately surrounded by 2,000 North Vietnamese soldiers.

Don Campbell served as a sniper for the 7th cavalry in Vietnam. He says, "It was like getting up to bat in a softball game. Everyone's patting me on the back and telling me to take him out, but it's a very emotional thing when you take all somebody else has to give. You never forget it."

Ray Tanner also served in the battle of La Drang. He says, "The first formation we had after we pulled out and looked down the line at our ranks, and see so many empty spots. That was sad, I mean everybody was hurting."

It's been called the "the battle that changed the war in Vietnam," one of its bloodiest events, and it certainly left its mark. The soldiers have survived a lot, but many of them are still fighting the toughest battle of all with PTSD.

"It's been a long hard walk back home because all of us have severe PTSD," Campbell says. But, back then, PTSD was just called 'shell shock,' and it was all but brushed under the rug. "They finally came up with a name for it, and they finally found out it was real," he explains.

But, reunions with close friends who survived the same experiences give the soldiers a chance to remember and a chance to heal. Friday, News 12 planned a special surprise for them. A Chinook chopper, the same helicopter the 7th cavalry used back in Vietnam, happened to be making a stop at Daniel Field Friday during a test flight. We arranged an up close look for our visiting heroes. Tanner says, "This brings back memories. We spent half of our life for a year riding these things."

It's a small memory from Augusta to take with them until the next time they can be together. Next year will mark the 50 year anniversary since the battle of La Drang, so they're planning a big reunion bash in Charleston, where they shipped out for Vietnam all those years ago.

By: Online News

25th February 2014

3rd Squadron, 7th Cavalry

The Deparment of the Army Announced that the 2ABCT (2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team), 3rd Infantry Division has been selected to shut down as part of the Army drawdown of personnel and infrastructure. Consequently, 3-7 Cav will cease to exist on 15 Jan 2015.

The Army also will reorganize its remaining Brigade Combat Teams by adding a third maneuver battalion to its remaining armored and infantry brigades. The Brigade Combat Teams also will receive additional engineer and fires capabilities.

These changes will make the Army’s remaining Brigade Combat Teams more lethal, flexible and agile.

By: LTC Kidder Jason, 3rd Squadron 7th Cavalry Commanding.

24th January 2014

In Remembrance

Ackiss, Alton J. SP-4 B 1-7 1965 01-22-2014

Virginia Beach - Alton Johnston Ackiss, Jr, 73,passed away unexpectedly on January 22, 2014. He was born in Princess Anne County, Virginia on April 29, 1940, and was a life long resident of Virginia Beach.

He was preceded in death by his parents, Alton Johnston Ackiss, Sr, and Elizabeth Blackwell Ackiss. Mr. Ackiss graduated from Staunton Military Academy and attended Chowan College and Atlantic Christian College. He was a veteran of the US Army, having served in Vietnam, B Company, 1st Calvary Division, 7th Calvary Regiment. He also was the co-owner of the Bel Air Motel in Norfolk for many years.

Left to cherish his memory are his children, Kim Ackiss Lewis and her husband Phillip, Leigh Ackiss Smith, and Alton Johnston Ackiss, III, and his wife Ginger, and their mother, Virginia Jackson Ackiss. His eight grandchildren, Brooke, Leigh, and Molly Stallings, Peyton and Abby Smith, AJ, IV, Blake, and Maggie Ackiss. Also surviving is his special friend Annette Smith, his sister Leslie Ackiss Griffin, and his brother in law, J.F. Jackson, III and his wife Connie.

A memorial service will be held on Sunday January 26, in H.D. Oliver Funeral Apts., Laskin Rd Chapel at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the wounded warrior project at woundedwarriorproject.org. Online condolences may be made to the family at HD Oliver

Submitted By: CSM Dennis Webster 1st CD Association

16th January 2014

Suicide Among Young Veterans Rising At Alarming Rate

I want to begin on an extremely serious note. I read an article recently that indicated a high suicide rate among veterans of the Iraqi and Afghanistan Wars. I immediately flashed back to a similar article that I read over 10 years ago where it was stated that ‘more Vietnam veterans had committed suicide than there were names on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington DC. I was astounded, “Why” – “how” after a year of day-to-day exposure to death by enemy fire, booby traps, poisonous snakes, leeches and the like; the demoralization of living in the constant monsoon rains, mud, or the extreme heat, that under a heavy jungle canopy was thick enough to shorten your breath, would someone so fortunate enough to have made it back to “the world” choose to end his life by his own hand? Why? Over the years, through my own experience and in contact with the men I served with, I became aware of a multitude of reasons that might make one begin the walk on that path. The acronym that our government chose to identify those reasons was PTSD. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. An officer friend of mine once quipped that it was improperly named. There is nothing ‘disorderly’ about it.

This condition has existed throughout every war, and under several names, but for the benefit of this article; let’s accept that it is called PTSD. Now let’s visualize the shape of a funnel. Big wide-open mouth at the top, and a much smaller opening at the bottom. Got it? All of the “reasons” fit into the top and out from the bottom comes PTSD. Fact! In the top go, flashbacks, intrusive thoughts, anniversary dates, startle response, replays of events in your mind, survivor guilt, and much much more. Out of the bottom comes a tense combination of anger, confusion, depression, and despair, that you don’t understand and you don’t know how to speak of it, or to whom that you could confide in about these “crazy thoughts”. I say “crazy” because at the onset of my own eruption of PTSD I didn’t understand it and I honestly believed that “those things” were the beginning of some kind of a stress breakdown. It didn’t help much either when I went to a DAV National Service Officer (NSO) to ask about treatment for PTSD and he factually stated that I should go to go to the local VA hospital emergency room and check myself in as a psychiatric emergency (so that I could see a doctor for treatment).

There are no words to describe my fear and feelings after hearing that from the NSO. I wasn’t a psychiatric anything and I had no intention of being branded that way. Fortunately I was in contact with guys I’d served with who’d been through the VA system for PTSD and I had no problem sharing my feelings and fears with them. “They” guided me through the explanation and treatment process that I was otherwise prepared to walk away from. They were at my left, right, front, or back in Vietnam and were now there as pointmen in bringing definition to these unexplainable emotions I was experiencing. I have to emphatically state that, 10 years ago, neither the NSO nor the VA was initially “helpful”. The NSO handled my paperwork in the same manner as a clerk would treat you at the motor vehicle dept. The VA treated me as a nobody until they received my records from St Louis. Only then, was I officially a veteran. A partial cause of that VA treatment was the large number of phonies who had read enough about PTSD and, without any combat service, walked into the VA and blurted out special ops experiences, classified records, and records destroyed in the infamous St Louis fire for which they were seeking help in the form of monetary compensation from the VA. Today, there are more phonies collecting disability for PTSD than you could possibly imagine – refer to the book Stolen Valor by B.G. Burkett).

Getting back on track, my point here is that combat changes everyone. No one comes home being the same person that they were and our returning vets are going to be dealing with a lot of the experiences that many of us have already gone through. Getting the right kind of “understanding” is vital to the veteran’s future well being and that same understanding is essentially important to the members of his/her family. Civilian-family can never comprehend the emotions and memories that are running through a vet’s mind. It’s more than they’ve seen on the evening news. The human mind is a theoretical camera. It takes snapshots of moments of each day of your life and stores them in your memory. The insignificant snapshots are temporary memory and deteriorate or get filed in your memory under letter Z. The significant snapshots are filed way up in front with letter A of your filing system. For the civilians, you see a war movie on TV, interrupted by commercials throughout (thus always keeping you in reality) and then a few minutes after the movie you’re watching a sitcom or something.

By the next morning, any emotions you experienced while watching the war movie are gone and forgotten. However, to the veteran, the commercials and sitcoms are secondary and inconsequential to the snapshots running through their memory’s slide projector. In the same manner that you begin Thanksgiving and automatically think of the remaining days until Christmas, your veteran can relate a similar date/holiday to the number of days (in the past) before his/her unit was hit, or was wounded, or a good friend was killed. Other than what I have identified here, from my own experiences, I am not medically qualified to go deeper into the subject of “combat trauma” which is what many of you veteran readers carry with you daily. For those of you who served in Iraq in 1991, Afghanistan, or recently or currently in Iraq (and their families) – make yourself aware of the potential of experiencing your memory’s combat footage. Accept it as “normal” and find someone to talk with. Vet Centers are open to all veterans of all wars. They are staffed by professionals who will help you understand flashbacks, anger and flare-ups, depression, and survivor guilt. They won’t make those feelings “go away” but they will help you to be conscientious of them and teach you how to cope with them – and slamming a car into a wall because no one could ever understand the thoughts and feelings you are experiencing is not the solution or an answer.

You are not alone! You were not alone during combat and if you’d just pick up a phone and call a few buddies that you served with you’ll find that you are not alone now. The key words here are First TEAM! (always).

Until your next visit, ... be well; stay well; and more important than anything else, walk tall and proud because you are CAV! FIRST TEAM!


Submitted By: Ron Migut - 7th Cavalry Association

31st October 2013

In Remembrance

SSG Jason A. Hicks who served with A Co., 2nd Battalion,7th Cavalry

SSG Jason A. Hicks who served with A Co., 2-7th CAV from 2008-12 died on 25 October. He was assigned to the Warrior Transition Brigade since 2012. Services for SSG Jason Hicks of Copperas Cove will be Tuesday, November 5, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Central Texas State Veterans Cemetery with full military honors. Jason was born on August 21, 1973 in Portsmouth, VA to Malcolm and Jane Sullivan Hicks.

SSG Hicks joined the Army in 1994 till his passing and served four tours in Iraq and two tours in Bosnia. He married Claudia Hiller on August 1, 1997 in Christiansfield, Denmark. Jason obtained a BA degree in Criminal Justice at CTC.

Obituary - Service - Guest Book

Submitted By: CSM Dennis Webster 1st CD Association

9th October 2013

In Remembrance

LTC (Ret) Bobby G. Hadaway, HHC. 1st Battalion,7th Cavalry

LTC (Ret) Bobby G. Hadaway, HHC, 1-7 Cavalry 1965-66 was killed in an automobile accident on 27 September.

Obituary - Service - Guest Book

Submitted By: CSM Dennis Webster 1st CD Association

16th September 2013

In Remembrance

John B Lynch Jr, E Co. - 1st Battalion,7th Cavalry

1LT John B. Lynch, Jr. LTC (R), 65, passed peacefully in his sleep Thursday, September 12, 2013 following an extended battle with cancer.

Born in Boston, Massachusetts September 16, 1947, John lived a distinguished life serving his nation and his community.

A natural leader, John spent twenty-two years serving his country in the United States Army, including three tours in Vietnam. Honors and commendations include the Combat Infantry Badge, the Soldiers Medal for Heroism, the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry, the Legion of Merit, five Bronze Stars and three Purple Hearts. The men under his command often say "John Lynch made us dangerous, because he made us fearless."

Obituary - Service - Guest Book

Submitted By: Tom Preece E Co. - 1st Battalion,7th Cavalry

5th September 2013

In Remembrance

David R. Jennings, C Co. - 2nd Battalion,7th Cavalry

CPT David R. Jennings, C Co., 2-7th Cavalry 1967-68 died Aug., 17 at his home in Pryor.

Obituary - Service - Guest Book

Submitted By: CSM Dennis Webster 1st CD Association

28 August 2013

In Remembrance

Herman Akins - 1st Battalion,7th Cavalry

Herman was a member of the Charlie Company 1st Battalion 7th Calvary, 1st Air Calvary Division and the American Legion Post 90, where he served as Sgt. at Arms. He was of the Baptist Faith. Mr. Akins was preceded in death by his parents, Neva and Rayford Akins; two brothers and sisters-in-law, Arnold Ray and Bunny Akins, Gary Akins and Ann Allen.

Obituary - Service - Guest Book

Submitted By: Ron Migut C 1-7

16th July 2013

In Remembrance

COL (Ret) William D. MacMillan, IV who commanded the 1-7th in Vietnam from July 1968 until January 1969 died on 12 July.
His obituary has not been published.
His funeral is planned for 26 July at the St. John’s Episcopal Church in Fayetteville, North Carolina.

Go Here: Obituary of Col MacMillan with access to Guestbook.

First Team!
Dennis Webster - Executive Director, 1st Cavalry Division Association

1st July 2013

In Remembrance

Richard F. Kuhn - 7th Cavalry Regiment

Richard F. Kuhn was born June 7, 1923, on top of the mountain in Foxville, MD. He wasn't blessed with height, but his accomplishments and work ethic would overcome that which haunted him as a youth. He was a survivor. At the age of 18 he joined the Army. He became part of the famous 7th Cavalry.
On June 26, 2013, he went to "Go Rest High On That Mountain."


11th June 2013

7th Cavalry Reunion

It is difficult to extract 7th Cavalry activity from a 1st Cavalry Division reunion. In reality we are individual unit designations unified as a body of one. It is apparent that while this "body" is composed of many components of the divisional anatomy, there flows just one blood of honor and respect flowing through it’s core. It is called "CAV".

As strangers approach each other and observe that the other is also donning a 7th Cavalry Crest, a voiced "GARRY OWEN" is offered up and usually followed by "who were you with and when were you there?" Nonetheless, any troopers passing by will acknowledge you with a nod, a wave, or a voiced "How are ya?"

The overall events open to the "body" were a golf tournament on day one and followed daily by a Welcoming Mixer, the Sweetheart Dance; a Gold Star Family breakfast and followed by individual war-era and regimental luncheons; and then:


25th April 2013

IaDrang Reunion

Members of the 1st Air Cavalry Division, who saw their story told in the book "We Were Soldiers Once And Young" by retired Lt. Gen. Harold G. Moore and war journalist Joseph L. Galloway, which was later turned into a feature film starring Mel Gibson, held their annual reunion at the Clarion Hotel in Branson.

"One of our members lives in Jonesboro, Ark., and they though it would be a good idea to have it here," said former 1st Air Cavalry Division member Ray Tanner. "Branson has been a courteous host, I’ll tell you that."

Even though the weather was less than stellar, that didn’t put a damper on the reunion of festivities.


10th April 2013

5th Battalion 7th Cavalry

The Department of Defense announced today the death of three soldiers who were supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

They died April 6 in Kandahar, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked their unit in Zabul, Afghanistan with a vehicle-borne improvised explosive device. They were assigned to the 5th Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Armor Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

Killed were:

SSG. Christopher M. Ward, 24, of Oak Ridge, Tenn.
SPC. Wilbel A. Robles-Santa, 25, of Juncos, Puerto Rico
SPC. Delfin M. Santos Jr., 24, of San Jose, Calif

For more information, media may contact the Fort Stewart public affairs office at 912-210-9375.

Submitted By: CSM Dennis Webster (Retired) 1st CDA

26th March 2013

Clothing donated by the residents of Millen, Georgia

Clothing donated by the residents of Millen, Georgia and collected by local Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), Post 2776, were delivered by Commander Byron Scogins to the Veterans Hospital, Dublin, Georgia in support of the Homeless Veterans Program. Accepting the donation is Mr Frank Brooks.

Byron Scoggins joined the 2nd Battalion 7th Cavalry as a platoon leader in early spring 1966. He was assigned to Charlie company and was badly wounded in May of 1966. He has done a very outstanding job of supporting all our vets...This is just one of the many endeavors he has completed on our behalf...

Submitted By: Bud Alley

20th March 2013

Ten years on, soldier recalls Iraq invasion

On March 19, 2003, Brockton native Luke Devlin, now 32, was a 22-year-old 2nd lieutenant, a 7th Cavalry tank platoon leader camped on the Iraqi border, about to cross what the Army called the Line of Departure as part of the 3rd Infantry Division’s historic move north to take Baghdad and topple Saddam Hussein. Devlin later served in Iraq at the height of the insurgency in 2005. He recalled the start of the war yesterday with Herald editor Jules Crittenden, who rode with the 3rd ID as an embedded reporter: Everybody was ready for it. We had been sitting in the desert for quite some time. At that point, it was getting kind of old. Everybody was ready to go home. It felt like the fastest way to go home was north. Through Baghdad ... moving into hostile territory. As we crossed the LD, it was surreal. If I saw someone, I could open fire.


1st December 2012

In Remembrance

1LT James Brigham (LTC Retired) HQ 2nd Battalion, 7th Cavalry 1965.

LTC James (Jim) Brigham of Charlotte, NC went to be with the Lord on Thursday 29, November.

Jim was originally enlisted and served with the 101st and 82nd Airborne Division. He was part of a classified drop into Panama in the Cuban missile crisis.

As an enlisted man He attended Jungle School and Rigger School. Upon completion of OCS he was posted at Benning in the 2nd ID and subsequently assigned to the First Cav (Airmobile) 2nd Battalion 7th Cavalry on July 1, 1965 as the Support Platoon Leader and de facto S-4 and as such did all the packing for movement and oversaw the entire conex container coding, etc. On the 17th of August he boarded the USS Rose for the trip to Vietnam. He shared a room with LT John Howard, MSC, LT Bud Alley and 1LT Andy Lawrence.

We shared shower facilities with Lt's Jeanette, Pujals, and Grove. Upon arrival LT Brigham became the "go to man"for everything we needed. He seemed to be MR. Fixit of the battalion in addition to being its chief scrounger, architect of the officer's club, chief engineer of its construction and main man of supply in the Ia Drang Valley for the 2-7. In December of 1965 he assumed command of the HQ company until March of 66 when he became the assistant S-4 for the battalion.

Jim left active duty in 1972 but continued with the reserve component in Charlotte, NC subsequently reaching the rank of Lt. Colonel. Following an early reunion of the 2-7 Jim began to resurrect contacts with all who had served in the 7th Cav and helped bring the Association to life again…

He was a member of the First Cav Division Board, as well as President of the 7th Cav Association. In addition to his leadership, he served as the loyal quartermaster of the Association. His wife Judy, passed away earlier this year and along with Jim their ashes returned to Oklahoma as they wished. We have all lost a dear friend. There will be no formal ceremony. At the family's request, memorial gifts may be made to the First Cav Scholarship Fund, the Vietnam Memorial Foundation, or the charity of one's choice.


View and Sign Guest book

Submitted By: Bud Alley

26th October 2012

In Remembrance

SGT Daniel F. Robinson, D Company, 1-7th Cavalry, 1965-66 died on 25 August 2012.

Daniel Forrest Robinson, "Big Dan the Machine Gun Man," 67, went to be with the Lord on Aug. 25. He was born in Richlands, Va. Dan has resided in the Hopewell/Prince George area for the last 45 years.

He is preceded in death by his parents, Malcolm Thurston Robinson Sr. and Ivory Alice Meadows Robinson.

He is survived by his wife, Charlotte L. Jamison Robinson; his daughters, Toni Gayle (David) Bucciarelli and Terri Jo (Kelly) Tolbert; grandchildren, Kaitlyn Nicole Tolbert, Ruger Daniel Satterfield, and Drew Steven Callis; one brother, M.T. (Terri) Robinson Jr.; and a host of nieces and nephews.

Big Dan was a member of the First United Methodist Church in Richlands, Va. Dan served in the Army 1/7th Cavalry in 1964-1966. He was the last surviving radio man of the Ia Drang Valley Battle. Dan retired from Allied Chemical in the '80s. Dan was a member of the VFW and a former member of the Colonial Heights Moose Lodge.

Dan was well known for his gun business in Hopewell, The Pro Gun Shop, his caring and helping for others, his love for life and his family and his larger than life personality. If he was still here he would tell you ... GARY OWEN!

Dennis Webster - Executive Director, 1st Cavalry Division Association

10th October 2012

In Remembrance

CSM Basil Plumley, 1st Battalion 7th Cavalry    "Ia Drang Valley 1965" (We Were Soldiers Once and Young) made his final Combat Assault into Fiddlers Green at 0400 this morning. (10th October 2012).

Visitation is Monday from 10am to 8pm at Striffler Hamby Funeral Home
4071 Macon Road Columbus, GA 31907
(706) 563-2372

GoTo: Striffler Hamby Funeral Home                GoTo: Guest Book

Funeral service is on Tuesday 10/16/2012 at 1pm at the old Chapel at Ft Benning, GA

Retired CSM Basil Plumley. Plumley, 92, died Wednesday morning at Columbus Hospice after he was recently diagnosed with colon cancer.

He was a veteran of the World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War.

During the Vietnam War, Plumley served as a sergeant major of the 1st Battalion 7th Cavalry Regiment. The unit's actions in 1965 during The Battle of Ia Drang were revisited in the book    "We Were Solders... and Young ".

The book became a movie in 2002.    We Were Soldiers, starred Mel Gibson; actor Sam Elliot portrayed CSM Plumley in the movie.

Plumley enlisted in the Army in 1942 and retired after 32 years of service. He later worked at Martin Army Hospital on post before retiring after 15 years of service.

Awards and decorations:
    Silver Star with one Oak Leaf Cluster
    Bronze Star with one Oak Leaf Cluster
    Purple Heart with three Oak Leaf Clusters
    Army Air Medal with eight Oak Leaf Clusters
    Army Presidential Unit Citation
    Army Good Conduct Medal
    American Campaign Medal
    European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal
                 with arrowhead device and one silver and
                 three bronze campaign stars (eight campaigns)
    World War II Victory Medal
    Army of Occupation Medal
    National Defense Service Medal with one Gold Star
    Korean Service Medal with one Arrowhead Device and three campaign stars
    Vietnam Service Medal with eight campaign stars
    Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation
    Republic of Vietnam Presidential Citation
    Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Citation with Palm three Awards
    United Nations Service Medal for Korea
    Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal
    Republic of Vietnam Civil Actions Unit Award Honor Medal
    Republic of Korea War Service Medal, Order of Saint Maurice
    Combat Infantryman Badge (third award)
    Master Parachutist Badge with five Combat Jump Stars
    French Croix de Guerre 82nd Airborne
    Belgian Croix de Guerre 82nd Airborne
    Dutch Order of the Orange 82nd Airborne
    Doughboy Award 1999

Bob Anderson - Jim Brigham - Ron Migut, The 7th Cavalry Association

31st July 2012

In Remembrance


Fort Hood officials have released the name of a Soldier who died of injuries in an incident involving a train July 26 in Copperas Cove, Texas.

Specialist Nicholas Paul Webb, 28, whose home of record is listed as Clifton, Texas, entered active duty service in August 2007 as a Motor Transport Operator. He was assigned to "D" Troop, 1st Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, since June 2008.

Webb deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom from February 2009 to February 2010. Webb's awards and decorations include the Army Commendation Medal, Army Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Iraqi Campaign Medal with campaign star, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Army Service Ribbon and Overseas Service Ribbon.

Dennis Webster - Executive Director, 1st Cavalry Division Association

14th June 2012

In Remembrance

Roberts Charles R PFC 7th Cavalry Regiment 1950-51 - Korea

ROBERTS, Charles R., 79 of Jamestown, OH and formerly of Middletown, OH went away to be with the Lord Monday June 4, 2012 at Greene Memorial Hospital. He was born February 24, 1933 to William Virgil and Elizabeth Roberts. His parents preceded him in death, also 3 wives, Ruth (Gebhard) Roberts, mother of his son, Dee (Cochran) Roberts, and Geri (Meadows) Roberts, an infant son, Baby Roberts, brothers, Richard Roberts and infant brother, Carl and a sister, Pauline Sexton. Surviving is a son, Master Sergeant Charles Roberts Jr., USMC (Ret.), wife, Allyson and grandchildren, Amanda Rae and Tyler James, of Swansboro, NC; brothers, Bill, Earl, and Paul and wife (Ruthie) Roberts; stepdaughter, Missy Gibson of Somerset, KY and stepson, Ron Meadows of Trenton, OH; fiancé and companion, Wilma Ferguson of Jamestown, OH; and numerous step-grandchildren, step-great grandchildren, a niece, and nephews.


14th June 2012

In Remembrance

COL (Ret) Victor T. Bullock, B Co., 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry

Colonel Bullock died Thursday in Lawton. Arrangements are under the direction of the Becker Funeral Home & Cremation Service.

He was born July 31, 1932 in Houston, Texas, to Clayborne T. and Doris (Lee) Bullock. When he was seven years old he moved to Lawton, Oklahoma where his father operated and owned the Hudson dealership. He graduated from Lawton High School where he lettered in football and track. He received a Congressional Appointment from Oklahoma to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Tom graduated on 5 June 1956 in the upper 1/3rd of his class of 448 graduates. He was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in the U.S. Army Infantry Branch.


14th June 2012

Maj. Gen. Anthony R. Ierardi - 1st Squadron 7th Cavalry

The 1st Cavalry Division will welcome a new commanding general during a change of command ceremony Thursday at Fort Hood, Texas.

Maj. Gen. Anthony R. Ierardi will take command of the division from Maj. Gen. Daniel Allyn, who recently brought the division headquarters home from a yearlong deployment to eastern Afghanistan.

Ierardi, who most recently was the director of force management in the office of the deputy chief of staff G-3/5/7 at the Pentagon, is no stranger to the 1st Cavalry Division. He previously served as the division’s operations officer (G-3) and also commanded 1st Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Aviation Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division.

Allyn will receive his third star and is slated to take command of the XVIII Airborne Corps at Fort Bragg, N.C.


11th June 2012

2-7 Trooper named to the U.S. Army Ranger Hall of Fame

A Carrollton man who is a veteran of the Vietnam and Iraq wars with 27 years of active service has been named to the U.S. Army Ranger Hall of Fame.

Col. Robert Powell will be honored July 12 at the 20th annual Ranger Hall of Fame ceremony in Marshall Auditorium at Ft. Benning, Ga. He will be among 12 inductees into the 2012 group.

“I’m humbled by this great honor bestowed upon me,” he said. “Other than my family, I’m most proud of having served as a combat infantryman in Vietnam and Iraq, and experiencing the great camaraderie, teamwork and brotherhood of these men serving in a noble cause.”

The U.S. Army Rangers are elite members of the U.S. Army, with a history dating back to the 17th Century and the French and Indian Wars. The six battalions of the modern Rangers have been deployed in wars in Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq, and saw action in several conflicts, including Panama and Grenada. The Ranger Training Brigade is headquartered at Ft. Benning.


27th May 2012

An almost forgotten soldier remembered Memorial Day Article

You can learn all about the battle that claimed Roy Lockhart’s life in a popular book and a Hollywood movie. But you can’t get a sense of his life without some serious legwork. Lockhart was killed in the battle of Ia Drang in 1965 in Vietnam.

He was the first Tuolumne County man — and actually among the first wave of Americans — killed in the decade-long Southeast Asian conflict.

Considering his place in at least local history, surprisingly little has been written or said about him.

Plaques bear his name in front of Sonora’s library and Washington Street’s military museum.


24th April 2012

The 7th Cavalry Clan of the United States of America.

Over the years British and Irish friends asked me what I did when I was in the Army. I proudly informed them that I was a member of the 3rd Squadron 7th United States Cavalry’s “Garryowen Bagpipe Band”. Next came questions about what clan we represented. I told them we didn’t represent a clan, we represented the 7th Cavalry and the United States. Their questions made me think about clans and the Band.

Though we are not members of a Traditional Clan, we are members of a clan. One of the definitions of a clan is a “large group of relatives or associates”. So, by definition the 7th United States Cavalry is a Clan and anyone who served in the 7th is a member of this clan. As Americans our Clan is open to all who served in the 7th. All members are accepted with no thought of ethnic background. We are all equal members. I guess you can say we are the 7th Cavalry Clan of the United States of America.


31st March 2012

Air Cavalry Medal of Honor recipient visits 1st ACB troopers in Afghanistan

For his actions that day, Crandall was awarded the Medal of Honor by former President George W. Bush during a ceremony at the White House Feb. 26, 2007.

More than 45 years removed from that fateful day in Vietnam, Crandall returned to a war zone here March 28. He’s no longer a pilot-in-command, just a citizen who wanted to personally thank soldiers for serving their country in combat.

“It’s a great responsibility and honor to have the opportunity to spend time with American Soldiers, especially over here,” said Crandall.

“I’ve wanted to come for a long time, and when I found out the ACB was deploying, I wanted to deploy with the brigade but they told me I was too old to re-enlist,” Crandall added with a smile.


14th March 2012

Vietnam Veterans Receive Silver, Bronze Stars

5th Battalion 7th Cavalry

FORT RILEY, Kan. (WIBW) -- An awards ceremony that's been years in the making has reunited current Fort Riley soldiers with those who went before them in combat.

After nearly 43 years, several Vietnam veterans were honored for their bravery Friday, decades after achieving success on the battlefield.

Four veterans from 1st Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Heavy Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, finally received their Silver Stars Friday morning on Fort Riley's Custer Hill. One veteran of the 16th Infantry was also awarded a Bronze Star for Valor.

The awards for heroism stem from a battle that took place August 12, 1969 in Quan Loi, South Vietnam. During the battle, soldiers with the Alpha and Bandido Charlie companies of the 16th Infantry Regiment, plus Delta company, 5/7th Cavalry from the 1st Air Cavalry Division to the rubber plantation West of Quan Loi.

by: Lindsey Rogers wibw.com


22nd February 2012

Act of valor: Receives Bronze Star 40 years later

2nd Battalion 7th Cavalry

SALISBURY — North Carolina. In the years following his military service, Sgt. Rodney Cress never thought his platoon leader would one day present him with an award for bravery.

But on Monday, Cress received the Bronze Star Medal with Valor device for heroism during the Vietnam Winter-Spring Campaign.

The medal is given for acts of bravery and heroism, and Cress was recognized for performing just such an act while he served as an infantry squad leader in the U.S. Army’s Charlie Co., 2nd of the 7th, 1st Cavalry Division.

It happened nearly 41 years ago, when Cress was a non-commissioned officer and was part of a 10-man patrol group sent out to search the perimeter of an area in the jungle.

by: Shavonne Potts - salisburypost.com


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